Chindōgu - part 3

I've been tempted for some time to do my planned updates to the Chindōgu, adding sound and more importantly, trying to throw together some code that avoids using Ekiga in the graphical desktop. The Pi Zero really struggles running the desktop and graphical applications but is fine when throwing stuff straight at the framebuffer.

Some research suggests it's possible to spin up OMX player wrapped in such a way it'll play a network stream straight from a camera and I'm going to try and use that for the video at least.

Coincidentally, there's currently a Hackaday retro competition and I think this could make an acceptable entry, if I get the software together and have several all talking to each other. I've accumulated multiple Sony Watchmen and Pi Zero Ws to do the build with.

To get started I've pinned out the main components on a board as it's otherwise hard to work on. One thing I want to do is get the image as decent as it can be and these horizontal gun CRTs were always dodgy.

Lacking a service manual I've worked out the function of the trimmers by trial and error.

  • RV501 - Vertical size
  • RV502 - Horizontal hold
  • RV503 - Keystone adjustment
  • RV504 - Horizontal size
Tweaking the framebuffer settings on the Pi Zero and tweaking these has made the display almost usable. With is set to 320x240 you can actually read the command line.

In praise of Adafruit IO

After a long delay on the delivery of the solar panels I want for my solar mesh nodes, I finally got around to doing some testing with them.

Unfortunately I was away from home and relying on tethering to a mobile phone for access to the Internet so using my home MQTT server for logging wasn't impossible, but was going to be inconvenient.


It occurred to me to give Adafruit IO a spin as it's designed for making generic IOT logging easy to set up.

Quick and easy to get working it has been logging just fine and I've not swapped back now I'm home. The dashboard is basic but all I need for this test.

In the first graph you can see the VPCC feature of the MCP73871 working well to avoid flatlining the voltage from the solar panel under load. It has a target voltage (arbitrarily set to ~5.3v here) and reduces current draw if the supply voltage drops below this. I've added a small trim pot to my test board to allow me to tweak this and do some runtime comparisons.

VPCC isn't MPPT but it will get better efficiency out of the panel than simply drawing until it can give no more and the voltage sags below a useful level. In the second graph you can see how without VPCC set the load on the same panel causes cycling like this, which also won't be doing the LiPo cells any good.

I have an idea ruminating to use an I2C controlled potentiometer along with a current sensor to make adjustments on the fly to try and optimise the solar output but it may be a minimal return compared to doing the tests once and picking a set value for VPCC. It will certainly increase component count.

There are packaged up MPPT solutions around, but there seems to be a gap in the market with them either super-efficient energy harvesting for tiny panels, or for large domestic/industrial power solutions. My scenario of ~4W panels with a ~100mA load isn't something I've spotted a good packaged solution for.

It wouldn't be impossible to roll my own MPPT boost convertor in front of the MCP73871 but like I said very likely to involve diminishing returns over careful use of VPCC.

Creating a UI on a microcontroller: Part 12

 

After much yak-shaving to make my UI library usable for other people I've finally made it public on GitHub.

It's very much a 'perfect is the enemy of good' initial release. It seems stable in use, I've written quite a chunk of documentation in Markdown and added an example for every widget type.

Now it's also been submitted to Arduino to see if I can get it listed in the Library Manager. If it is this will be a big milestone for me, giving back to the community.

I'm gonna need a bigger bench

Ever since I got my cheap Ender-2 I've been a fan of Creality 3D printers. That got partnered with an Ender-3 when a cheap Black Friday deal appeared and I can almost treat this one like an appliance. So long as the removable bed plate is cleaned and degreased occasionally it just prints.

I know some people struggle with their Creality printers, build quality can be variable, but both mine have been excellent and an Ender-3 of some flavour is my default recommendation to somebody new to 3D printing.

This is not because they're the best, they're far from it, it's because they're adequate and cheap. If you find you're using an Ender-3 lots, great now start modding it or buy something better. If it gathers dust after the novelty wears off you've only wasted £150-200 or thereabouts.

My Ender-3 gets used lots and short of an Octoprint setup, webcam and lighting isn't actually functionally modified at all. I'm into practical structural prints that will probably get some refinishing, not beauty prints. The Ender-2 is mostly idle but I sometimes run both at the same time if I'm working hard on a project.

Now I've scored a used CR-10 Max, which is at the other end of the spectrum of Creality printers. It's their biggest at a build volume of 450x450x470 and on account of that, by far their most expensive model. The huge heated bed has its own PSU.

For a long time I've wanted the facility to print larger items and I've got some costume parts I had literally been wondering about how to create in the days running up to seeing this for sale. Now I need to up my 3D modelling skills to being able to produce armour pieces.

Breaking out of the Espressif/Arduino rut

I have been noodling around with ESP8266/8285/32 microcontrollers almost exclusively now for a couple of years. 

The absolutely excellent price/feature/performance combo of these Espressif MCUs means I simply don't see any reason to change. There  have been a couple of things I built using AVR based Arduinos for very specific reasons to do with high I/O pin count or generating IR Lasertag signals with hardware timers, but that's it.

I've also mostly given up on Raspberry Pi based things because once an MCU has Wi-Fi and >64KB of RAM you can do most single-purpose things apart from a complicated GUI and I've been working on a workaround for the latter.

Likewise, much as people sneer at the Arduino IDE it is terribly easy to set up and use, broadly supported and just C++ (with an odd/incomplete selection of standard libraries) under the hood.

I have however been tempted by the new Raspberry Pi Pico. It's cheap (for now), dual core, has native USB, plenty of I/O and a massive push behind it comparable to the Adafruit Feather ecosystem. So I tacked a Pico and interesting carrier board onto an order from Pimoroni to have a play with one.

This could be my gateway to MicroPython, although I can see myself also having a go with C++ as this board is actually a good candidate for porting my serial terminal UI library, given it has no wireless connectivity.

Solar charging ESP-Now BATMAN prototype 6

Prototype 5 sucked, trying to bodge in the ESP32-S2 breakout to the old board just didn't work well, so I did another prototype. Also as I now have the Nordic Semiconductor Power Profiler II, testing and measuring power use is so much easier and I could ditch the INA219 current sensors. These added a lot of mess to the previous prototypes.

As it's easy to adjust the voltage from the PPK2 it almost stands in as a dummy solar panel, although you can't current limit the output.

This latest prototype mostly came about because I designed a new schematic in EasyEDA, had a crisis of confidence about pin choice and how well it would work and resolved to just build it. Also it's Chinese New Year and I'm not in a hurry to order the boards.

I'm now absolutely set on using the ESP32-S2 for this project but I'll run this prototype off the panels for a few days and see how it behaves.

Update: I can't continue using the PAM2301 buck regulator I had intended to, testing showed it 'trips out' when panel voltage is ~6v. Which is fair enough given that's what's in the data sheet, but my expectation was charging load would keep voltage on a 5.5v panel below that, even though no-load voltage can be quite high. This is not true.

Creating a UI on a microcontroller: Part 11

I've been doing lots of work on the flow of things in the user interface in the terminal application so it works better. The deeper in I get the more boilerplate I'm writing to make buttons appear and disappear without leaving stuff floating around, so it's quite slow progress.

On the plus side, the syncing of user accounts and so on is working nicely and I've now made it so that it live updates. Make a change to a user and it appears near-instantly on the other terminals. Previously it synced the files on the SD card but they didn't show until a reboot.

Actually coding that to happen took another swathe of boilerplate but each time I do a thing like this I'm edging closer to a believable looking application. Also a bit of bugfixing which might have finally nailed the occasional exceptions when using a mouse.



As it's getting closer to something I can demonstrate I did a quick show and tell on Brian Lough's 'Project Doc' stream this evening. Which I believe is recorded for posterity.



Creating a UI on a microcontroller: Part 10

I've done a little more work on my retro 'computer terminal' application. When it started out, the key feature was messaging over the mesh network library I've also been working on.

All the code was there but just commented out while I got the user interface library knocked into shape. So I uncommented it and spent some time making some improvements. Again it also showed up some limitations in the UI library. Most of these were around showing/hiding the cursor and moving it back to the line where you're typing reliably.

With these ironed out, the basic chat functionality pretty much just worked despite being written a year ago and not touched since.

I've done a little video of two terminals sending chat messages. At one point I had a 'bot' that produced Lorem Ipsum any time there was activity in a chat. I must dust that off.